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      Bumps & Boo-Boos
      1)
      DO NOT use Syrup of ipecac: This was once used to induce vomiting after a poison substance was swallowed. Now it's known to do more harm than good.
      2)
      DO NOT use Burn cream: The only thing you should use on burned or scalded skin is cold (not icy) water (to ease pain), and a sterile bandage.

      Essentials for Bumps & Boo-Boos

      Uh-oh! The first time your baby bangs his head on the coffee table or scrapes his knee on the playground, it will probably hurt you more than it hurts him: Owies are inevitable, but you'll weather them much better if you supplement your basic first-aid kit with a few baby-specific additions.

      BANDAGES
      Skip the plain-Jane flesh-toned ones that you use yourself, and look for kid-friendly bandages that are brightly-colored, adorned with fun designs, and small enough to fit comfortably on little body parts. Bandages for children are usually "ouchless" too--meaning it won't hurt when you pull them off.
      FIRST-AID CREAM
      What you want is an over-the-counter antibacterial cream or ointment to use on scrapes or cuts (i.e., on wounds in which the skin is broken), after the area's been washed with soap and water or a "sting-free: boo-boo cleaner", and before you put a bandage on it.
      SPRAY-ON ANTISEPTIC CLEANSER
      On minor boo-boos (where there's not a lot of ground-in dirt, say, or blood), a good spritz of an antiseptic spray can stand in for soap and water. A "sting-free" boo-boo cleaner is best, of course: Your goal is to stop the tears, not get them started again.
      ICE PACK
      A gel pack that you keep in the fridge or freezer will help keep a bump or bruise from swelling too much. Look for ones made just for kids--they're small, so you can really target the injured area, and they're colorful and cute, which will help distract your little one from the pain.
      PAIN RELIEVER
      Acetaminophen is fine for a baby of any age; don't buy ibuprofen for an infant under 6 months. (Ask the pediatrician which drugs to use when, and how much.) Liquids are the only option for infants and very young kids (chewables and meltables are safe for kids over age 2); they come in different flavors; some are colorless--no stains if your baby spits right out what you put in!
      And don't forget the most powerful boo-boo healer of all--your touch. Kiss it, blow on it, just hold your baby tight and he'll feel better no matter what's hurting him.